Electric harley motorcycle

Harley-Davidson is currently doing a cross-country tour promoting it's latest innovation: the Project LiveWire Experience. The 111-year old motorcycle company has created its first all-electric bike. It's not yet offered for sale, as Harley-Davidson wants to travel across the U.S. and find out what their riders want in an electric motorcycle.

"We offer a no excuses riding experience in everything we do and we are led by what our customers tell us matters most," said Senior Vice President Mark-Hans Richer in a press release. "Because electric vehicle technology is evolving rapidly, we are excited to learn more from riders through the Project LiveWire Experience to fully understand the definition of success in this market as the technology continues to evolve."

The Project LiveWire Experience will be touring America until the end of 2014. After which, the LiveWire will go on tour to Canada and Europe. Harley-Davidson is hoping to incorporate feedback from the public into the design of later model electric motorcycles. According to Wired, to meet the recharge and range times that Harley-Davidson claims to have with the bike, the battery must weigh around 250 pounds. From that heavy of a battery, the motorcycle gets 74 horsepower and a top speed of 92 mph.

Does the LiveWire have the classic Harley sound?
Harley-Davidson​ bikes are well known for their stylish look, their feel and their loud engines. The LiveWire is an engine-less bike so it does not have the sound Harley-Davidson riders are familiar with. It has been designed to be loud, but in a way that's completely unique to the LiveWire.

Does a rider need motorcycle insurance for the Harley-Davidson LiveWire?
If the bike were on sale today, and sold as is, then it'd require motorcycle insurance. The bike can accelerate to 60 mph in 4 seconds. Compare that to most state laws that require vehicles over 50cc (which typically reach 35 mph) to have insurance. Electric motorcycles, though innovative and environmentally friendly, fall under the same laws as other vehicles.

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