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Come January 1, legions of people will have promised themselves to get their fitness acts together. In many cases, these promises will be well-intentioned but empty. However, a certain subset of those individuals will put forth a sincere effort. Here's how your fitness business can help those clients achieve their New Year's resolutions. By the way, with a host of new clients signing on, it's a great time to review your business insurance for fitness professionals, too.

Focus on a Goal Instead of the Resolution

A resolution can be a fleeting thing, particularly when it's made in the heat of a moment. Meanwhile, a goal is a proposition toward which progress can be assessed. Helping clients set specific, measurable goals that are achievable within a certain time frame gives them the incentive to follow through.

However, within that goal setting, there are some key tasks.

Institute Short-Term and Long-Term Goals

In most cases, the 20 or 30 extra pounds clients have vowed to lose crept on over time. It was a long-term occurrence, which means only a long-term strategy will keep the weight from returning. However, all fitness plans require a short-term plan of action to melt fat and build muscle in the first place. A good fitness routine incorporates daily workout goals with healthy lifestyle changes.

Teach your client how to attack the situation in small bites; they'll feel better because progress will be more visible. This will also address overarching lifestyle factors like nutrition and sleep. Combining short-term and long-term goincreaseases their probability of success.

Have Them Put Goals in Writing

It's very easy for a person to say, “I want to lose 30 pounds” starting on January 1st and forget about it by April 1st. However, when you have them write it down, the thought becomes a contract they're more likely to honor. The act of putting it on paper solidifies their intention. It also serves as an in-their-face reminder of their commitment. Have your clients sign a sheet after each session—prominently featuring their goal—to remind them what they're working towards.

Maintain a Diary to Measure Progress

The diary's first page should list the client's short-term and long-term goals. Subsequent pages should recount each day's effort toward attaining them. Notations can include exercise routines, the daily weigh-in, and what they ate. Maintaining a record also gives them a concrete means by which to evaluate their progress. This can also help you determine what to adjust when they seem to be falling short or getting frustrated.

Conduct Regular Evaluations

The beauty of this strategy is its definitive start and end points. This makes it easier to measure progress along the way and implement adjustments in the program where needed. If they're off track, you can figure out why and make the needed tweak. If they're proceeding apace, they will be stoked to continue. Either way, conducting regular evaluations has significant benefits.

When you convert resolutions into goals, your fitness business can help clients achieve their New Year's resolutions more readily. Word-of-mouth being the best advertising, you are almost assured of getting new clients with each success. Are you ready for an influx of eager clients? This makes the need for business insurance for fitness professionals more acute. The more clients you get, the more risk you take on.

CoverHound can help you solve this classic conundrum by finding you affordable coverage for free. Compare policy options today!

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